Red meat

Red meat comes from cows, calves, horses, goats, sheep and pigs, as well as from game, such as deer, hare, rabbit and wild boar. Eating red meat is associated with a number of health risks, for various reasons. Red meat is often high in saturated fats and haem (complex iron-containing compounds), for example. Harmful substances may also be produced by frying or grilling meat. Nitrites are often added to meat to extend its shelf life and maintain an attractive red colour.

Red meat and your health

There are a number of health effects associated with eating a lot of red meat.

Red meat increases the risk of Alzheimer’s

There are indications that eating red meat increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of a stroke

Eating 100 to 120 grams of red meat per day (processed and unprocessed) is associated with a 10% higher risk of a stroke. Red meat has a high haem content. These are complex iron-containing compounds which may be damaging to blood vessels.

You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of type 2 diabetes

Eating 100 grams of red meat each day increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 15%.

You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of bowel cancer

There is strong evidence that eating red meat increases the risk of developing various types of cancer, including bowel cancer. Red meat has a high haem content. These are complex iron-containing compounds which may stimulate the development of bowel cancer.

Eating 100 grams of red meat each day increases the risk of developing bowel cancer by 10%. You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of stomach cancer

There is evidence that eating red meat increases the risk of developing various types of cancer, including stomach cancer. Processed red meat in particular is associated with a clearly increased risk.

You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of oesophageal cancer

There is evidence that eating red meat increases the risk of developing various types of cancer, including oesophageal cancer. You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of lung cancer

Eating 100 grams of red meat each day increases the risk of developing lung cancer by 20%. You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

Red meat increases the risk of prostate cancer

There are indications that eating red meat increases the risk of developing prostate cancer. You should therefore limit the amount of red meat in your diet to a maximum of 300 grams per week. Go vegetarian for a day from time to time or replace red meat with fish, chicken or other poultry.

iGene Passport

iGene offers you an insight into your personal risks of developing conditions and tells you whether eating less red meat may be particularly important for you to help prevent certain conditions. In addition, an iGene Passport provides you with information on what else you can do to reduce any risks. Here we focus on behaviour that will help you maximise the benefits to your health. In the publication below you can read more about what iGene can do for you.