Burnt meat

There may be some health risks associated with eating burnt or charred meat. When proteins in meat, fish or poultry are cooked at a high temperature for a long time, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be produced. The same applies to meat, fish or poultry that comes into direct contact with flames, e.g. on a barbecue.

Burnt meat and your health

There are a number of health effects associated with eating burnt meat.

Burnt meat increases the risk of bowel cancer

There are indications that eating burnt or charred meat increases the risk of developing bowel cancer. It is therefore a good idea not to eat any burnt or charred products or to cut off any burnt areas before eating.

Burnt meat increases the risk of oesophageal cancer

There are indications that eating burnt or charred meat increases the risk of developing oesophageal cancer. It is therefore a good idea not to eat any burnt or charred products or to cut off any burnt areas before eating.

iGene Passport

iGene offers you an insight into your personal risks of developing conditions and tells you whether limiting your consumption of burnt or charred meat may be particularly important for you to help prevent certain conditions. In addition, an iGene Passport provides you with information on what else you can do to reduce any risks. Here we focus on behaviour that will help you maximise the benefits to your health. In the publication below you can read more about what iGene can do for you.

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